Celebrating Eid Ul-Adha During Covid-19

From Friday to Sunday, Muslims around the world celebrated a religious holiday called Eid Ul-Adha. It is a holiday that celebrates Abraham’s sacrifice to God and follows the completion of the annual Hajj pilgrimage, at the time of Qurbani (sacrifice). Traditionally, the day is spent celebrating with family, friends and loved ones, often wearing new or best attire and the giving of gifts. But due to Covid-19, Muslims had to adjust to celebrating Eid, as many of them were not able to visit mosques or family members. My family and I were only able to visit one family member but enjoyed food and Eid celebration. My aunt even gave me a gift and I got my henna done and dressed up in fancy clothes.

But what is Eid Ul Adha and what’s its significanc? According to https://www.muslimaid.org/media-centre/blog/what-is-eid-ul-adha/

“The day of Eid-ul-Adha falls on the tenth day in the final (twelfth) month of the Islamic Lunar Calendar; Dhu-al-Hijjah. The day that celebrations fall on is dependent on a legitimate sighting of the moon, following the completion of the annual Holy Pilgrimage of Hajj –  which is an obligation for all Muslim’s who fit specific criteria, one of the important Five Pillars of Islam.

The celebration of Eid-ul-Adhais to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim’s devotion to Allah SWT and his readiness to sacrifice his son, Ismail. At the very point of sacrifice, Allah SWT replaced Ismail with a ram, which was to be slaughtered in place of his son. This command from Allah SWT was a test of Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness and commitment to obey his Lord’s command, without question. Therefore, Eid-ul-Adha means the festival of sacrifice.

Depending on the country, the celebrations of Eid-ul-Adha can last anywhere between two and four days. The act of Qurbani(sacrifice) is carried out following the Eid Salaah (Eid Prayers), which are performed in congregation at the nearest Mosque on the morning of Eid.

The act of Qurbaniconsists of slaughtering an animal as a sacrifice to mark this occasion in remembrance of Prophet Ibrahim’s sacrifice for Allah SWT. This is also known as Udhiya. The days of animal sacrifice total three days, from the 10th to the 12th of Dhu-al-Hijjah.

The sacrificial animal must be a sheep, lamb, goat, cow, bull or a camel; the sheep, lamb or goat consist of one Qurbani share, whereas a bull, cow or camel consist of seven shares per animal. The animal must be in good health and over a certain age in order to be slaughtered, in a “halal” friendly, Islamic way.

The Qurbanimeat can then divided into three equal portions per share; one-third is for you and your family, one-third is for friends, and the final third is to be donated to those in need.”

Eid Mubarak to all my USG Friends and Community!!! If anyone is interested in wanting to learn more about Islamic traditions and holidays, you can message me @mimi2491

About mimi2491

I am a first-generation Immigrant from Pakistan and I am a senior at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. I am currently taking classes at the Universities of Shady Grove. My major is History with a minor in Public History. I am passionate about the history field and I particularly focus on history through Global or World History perspective. After obtaining my bachelors, I will be applying for a Masters program in History. My career goal is to either teach history or work in a Museum, where I can use my knowledge of history to better my community.
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